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Eating fossil fuels : oil, food and the coming crisis in agriculture Dale Allen Pfeiffer.

By: Pfeiffer, Dale Allen.
Publisher: Gabriola Island, BC : New Society Publishers, c2006Description: xv, 127 p. : gráficos 22 cm.ISBN: 0865715653; 9780865715653.Subject(s): Abastecimiento de Alimentos | Agricultura | Agricultura Sostenible | Industria y Comercio de Alimentos | Industria y Comercio de Petróleo | Combustibles Fósiles | Agricultura y Estado -- Cuba | Agricultura -- Corea del Norte | Recursos EnergéticosDDC classification: 338.19
Contents:
Food=energy +nutrients. Land degradation. Water degradation. Eating fossil fuels . The end of the oil age. The collapse of agriculture. The next "green revolution". Building a sustainable agriculture. Twelve fun activities for activists
Summary: The miracle of the Green Revolution was made possible by cheap fossil fuels to supply crops with artificial fertilizer, pesticides, and irrigation. Estimates of the net energy balance of agriculture in the United States show that ten calories of hydrocarbon energy are required to produce one calorie of food. Such an imbalance cannot continue in a world of diminishing hydrocarbon resources. This book examines the interlinked crises of energy and agriculture and highlights some startling findings: The worldwide expansion of agriculture has appropriated fully 40 percent of the photosynthetic capability of this planet. The Green Revolution provided abundant food sources for many, resulting in a population explosion well in excess of the planet's carrying capacity. Studies suggest that without fossil fuel-based agriculture, the United States could only sustain about two-thirds of its present population. For the planet as a whole, the sustainable number is estimated to be about two billion. Concluding that the effect of energy depletion will be disastrous without a transition to a sustainable, re-localized agriculture, the book draws on the experiences of North Korea and Cuba to demonstrate stories of failure and success in the transition to non-hydrocarbon-based agriculture. It urges strong grassroots activism for sustainable, localized agriculture and a natural shrinking of the world's population.
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Food=energy +nutrients. Land degradation. Water degradation. Eating fossil fuels . The end of the oil age. The collapse of agriculture. The next "green revolution". Building a sustainable agriculture. Twelve fun activities for activists

The miracle of the Green Revolution was made possible by cheap fossil fuels to supply crops with artificial fertilizer, pesticides, and irrigation. Estimates of the net energy balance of agriculture in the United States show that ten calories of hydrocarbon energy are required to produce one calorie of food. Such an imbalance cannot continue in a world of diminishing hydrocarbon resources. This book examines the interlinked crises of energy and agriculture and highlights some startling findings: The worldwide expansion of agriculture has appropriated fully 40 percent of the photosynthetic capability of this planet. The Green Revolution provided abundant food sources for many, resulting in a population explosion well in excess of the planet's carrying capacity. Studies suggest that without fossil fuel-based agriculture, the United States could only sustain about two-thirds of its present population. For the planet as a whole, the sustainable number is estimated to be about two billion. Concluding that the effect of energy depletion will be disastrous without a transition to a sustainable, re-localized agriculture, the book draws on the experiences of North Korea and Cuba to demonstrate stories of failure and success in the transition to non-hydrocarbon-based agriculture. It urges strong grassroots activism for sustainable, localized agriculture and a natural shrinking of the world's population.

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